Activities for Technology Resources

Activities for Technology Resources

Presentation Projects:
Students research a topic and use Nearpod, Prezi®, Explain Everything, or PowerPoint® to present information.

Example Presentation Projects:

Student Created Test Banks:
As a review for an exam or quiz, students develop assessment questions in various formats including: multiple-choice, true/false, fill-in-the-blank, and open-ended. Students then create a Socrative quiz to assess their partner, small groups, or whole class. Another option is for the teacher to collect the questions and create a class assessment based on student created questions. Nearpod could also be used especially for questions that require students to illustrate work by using the Draw It feature.

Socrative and Nearpod allow registered users to share their work. Search through the shared resources and then adapt them to meet the needs of your class and curriculum.

Storyboards:
Storyboards are great graphic organizers that use sequences of illustrations and images. Students can take pictures using their smartphone or tablet device and then create a digital storyboard using Explain Everything on a tablet or Storyboard That at www.storyboardthat.com. Storyboarding allows students to depict what they have learned and expand upon it, and it encourages collaboration in a group setting.

Scavenger Hunts:
Send students on an educational scavenger hunt where they document their adventure with smartphone or tablet technology. After discovering and capturing the clues or items, students create an Explain Everything screencast video or an interactive iBook® to present their findings, and add a deeper element of research and understanding of the content.

How-To Video Tutorials:
When students explain their thought and problem solving processes, teachers can assess their level of understanding. Explain Everything can also be used by students to create short “How To” video tutorials on single concepts throughout a unit. These tutorials can be combined or grouped to make a portfolio documenting their learning experience throughout the unit. The teacher can showcase a “How To” video of the week on their class website, social media page, or school site. These videos allow students to practice 21st century technology skills while demonstrating course content and highlighting their creativity. Developing pride in their own work is an important aspect of education, which can be supported through projects like this.

Amped-Up Note Taking:
Notability® is a powerful resource for students to create class notes including: colored illustrations and annotations, outlines, snap photos, and recorded audio linked to content for easy navigation during playback. Moreover, Notability® automatically backs up notes to Dropbox, Google Drive, or Box for easy storage and retrieval. Notes are now readily accessible from the Cloud. Teachers can create guided notes, handouts, worksheets, or homework which the students can open in Notability®. Once the documents are completed, students can save to their preferred storage location and email their work to the teacher.

Exit Tickets:
Exit tickets are a classic end-of-class activity where the students are asked to provide feedback or solve a problem on a notecard or half sheet of paper. The informal information provides teachers with insight into their students’ knowledge and can be used for planning content for the next class session.

Socrative has a built-in Exit Ticket option. Once the Exit Slip is launched and the students enter input their names, three questions are presented to them. The first question asks how well they learned today’s materials, and students respond by selecting one of the following options: Totally get it, Pretty well, Not very well, or Not at all. The second question is an open-ended, short response question that asks the students to explain what they learned in class today. The last question is a problem presented on the board for the students and is intended for the teacher to customize the Exit Slip. After students submit the activity, the data can be downloaded as an Excel® workbook and used to differentiate instruction, design an Entrance Ticket for the next day, form study groups, or adjust material for the following day’s lesson.

Designing your own Exit Ticket template in Socrative can be done by simply creating a quiz and naming it appropriately. Teachers can create a quiz by class title, such as Physics, or by class period. When ready to start your customized Exit Ticket, select either Student Paced or Teacher Paced activity.

Space Race Review Game:
The Space Race is a built-in feature of Socrative which allows up to 10 teams of students to answer questions in a self-paced game. The team whose rocket travels furthest across the screen wins the race. This game offers an interactive review for an exam, or a pre-assessment to determine students’ prior knowledge. Transform your classic Jeopardy® review into different quizzes based on the categories and launch them one at a time as a Space Race. The results per team are instant, and teachers can answer questions or address misconceptions between each race.